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Old 04-14-2011, 10:59 PM   #11
Olle P
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Weaselsmasher View Post
You can also get bold and try with the Intel stock cooler.
Not to mention the AMD stock cooler that came with my Athlon64 X2, that's really rough!

Cheers
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Old 04-15-2011, 12:17 AM   #12
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The MX-4 looks interesting because it claims carbon nano-particles (which I assume is carbon nanotubes). I've experienced them at work and they're certainly "interesting". Even if it's not something most people would purchase ($3.75/g is relatively expensive), it would be interesting to know how much the nanotubes affect the thermal conductivity of the paste.
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Old 04-15-2011, 05:01 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rafael Coelho View Post
Probably the main difference between a good and a bad TIM is the performance after one or more year of the application. But we don't know how to test this.
In industry the way to accelerate aging testing is Shake 'n Bake.

Put the system through several freeze/thaw cycles, and then subject it to vibration. If there is material present that is prone to drying out and cracking, this will usually find it out.

If you have a freezer, a hot box (system case without fans, maybe with an extra 100W lightbulb thrown in), and a vibrator (a room fan with a blade removed will do the trick), you could set up your own Shake 'n Bake procedure.
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Old 04-15-2011, 06:24 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hangfirew8 View Post
In industry the way to accelerate aging testing is Shake 'n Bake.

Put the system through several freeze/thaw cycles, and then subject it to vibration. If there is material present that is prone to drying out and cracking, this will usually find it out.

If you have a freezer, a hot box (system case without fans, maybe with an extra 100W lightbulb thrown in), and a vibrator (a room fan with a blade removed will do the trick), you could set up your own Shake 'n Bake procedure.
This system can be used to test metal fadigue and other crack-relationed failures, but it will not have the same effect of 1 year of use on a thermal compound.
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Old 04-15-2011, 09:00 AM   #15
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I thank you for an informative (and I'm sure labor intensive series)! And since good work always ..
Another vote for Shin-Etsu.
Testing a cooler with a rough surface, and or one with contact pipes where the thermal product fills the space between heat tubes and base, would be helpful and informative.
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Old 04-18-2011, 05:11 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arctucas View Post
How about some Shin-Etsu?
We will include it in one of the next roundups.
Thanks for suggesting!
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Old 04-19-2011, 10:23 AM   #17
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Can you add this really cool Innovation Cooling Diamond "7 Carat" Thermal Compound to the next roundup too? its called IC7 for short. =)
I know its in a different class at $15 a tube but it would be awesome to see it on the list.
Loving all these compound roundups.

Last edited by RikiTiki; 04-19-2011 at 10:26 AM.
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Old 04-19-2011, 10:59 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RikiTiki View Post
Can you add this really cool Innovation Cooling Diamond "7 Carat" Thermal Compound to the next roundup too? its called IC7 for short. =)
I know its in a different class at $15 a tube but it would be awesome to see it on the list.
Loving all these compound roundups.
We will try to get this one.
Thanks!
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Old 04-26-2011, 09:20 AM   #19
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Originally Posted by Weaselsmasher View Post
As commented in the article, the tests were done on a very high quality cooler with a polished base. I would like to see how a moderate-quality cooler, with a base that still displays significant machining roughness, does with the various compounds. The question I would love to see answered is this:

"If I already own a cooler with a rough base, will I see a worthy gain by getting a tube of premium thermal paste?"

An owner whose budget does not allow for a new $60-plus cooler but who can afford a 5-dollar tube of goo would benefit from knowing whether they can get, say, 5 degrees better cooling with their preexisting equipment, and therefore either get a little more overclocking headroom or a little more longevity. It's these little 5-dollar bits of wisdom that are of the greatest value to the hardware enthusiast on a limited budget.
the difference between rough machined and mirror finish is about 7~8c this I know from using and Tuniq Tower 120 (rough as F base) and an ThermoLab Baram (shiny mirror base) and the Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound.. both HSF's were in my Silverstone Raven RV02b-w case and used on an Phenom II x4 940 @ 3.41GHz 1.4v 2200Mhz HT/NB room temp was 23c

Using F@H SMP to heat up the CPU
Tuniq Tower 120 idle 34c load 59c
Thermolab Baram idle 29c load 51c

both used an SilverStone 120mm Air Penetrator fan at 1500rpm 35.7cfm

Last edited by Athlonite; 04-26-2011 at 09:25 AM.
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Old 04-26-2011, 01:04 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Athlonite View Post
the difference between rough machined and mirror finish is about 7~8c this I know from using and Tuniq Tower 120 (rough as F base) and an ThermoLab Baram (shiny mirror base) and the Arctic Silver 5 thermal compound.. both HSF's were in my Silverstone Raven RV02b-w case and used on an Phenom II x4 940 @ 3.41GHz 1.4v 2200Mhz HT/NB room temp was 23c

Using F@H SMP to heat up the CPU
Tuniq Tower 120 idle 34c load 59c
Thermolab Baram idle 29c load 51c

both used an SilverStone 120mm Air Penetrator fan at 1500rpm 35.7cfm
That is far from being a valid test. The ONLY way to properly evaluate a rough versus smooth base is to take a heatsink with a rough base, get the temps that way, then lap the base until it is smooth, then mount it back on the same system with the same cpu using the same TIM (from the exact tube used in the first test), use the exact same fan, then take measurements again. Using two different heatsinks totally invalidates the results.

In all of the tests I have done over the past 10+ years has shown that a it can give as little as 1or 2C difference to more than 10C difference. In fact, on some heatsinks the results are BETTER with the rough surface than when they are lapped.
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