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Old 07-21-2009, 10:41 AM   #1
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Default Antec TruePower New 750 W (TP-750) Power Supply Review

There has been a new article posted.

Title: Antec TruePower New 750 W (TP-750) Power Supply Review
URL: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/766

Here is a snippet:
"The new TruePower (TP) series from Antec is based on a DC-DC converter on the secondary, i.e. it is basically a +12 V power supply with two small power supplies in charging of converting the +12 V out..."

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Old 07-22-2009, 05:27 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabe View Post
From the six diodes available (two per component), two are used for the direct rectification and four are used for the “freewheeling” part (i.e. to discharge the +12 V coil). Thus for our math we need to consider the path with the lower current limit, which is the direct rectification path. http://www.hardwaresecrets.com
I don't quite agree with this. The current limit determined by series diodes is I/D=20A*2/0.40=100A (assuming a maximum Duty Cycle of 0.40). The limit determined by freewheeling diodes is I/(1-D)=20A*4/(1-0.30)=114A.
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Old 07-22-2009, 07:45 AM   #3
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The label could be blue or another neutral color, pink doesn't fit

Nice PSU.
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Old 07-22-2009, 03:34 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travis View Post
I don't quite agree with this. The current limit determined by series diodes is I/D=20A*2/0.40=100A (assuming a maximum Duty Cycle of 0.40). The limit determined by freewheeling diodes is I/(1-D)=20A*4/(1-0.30)=114A.
Hi Travis,

Please clarify. If this unit has a duty cycle of 30% or 40%, then on the formula we should use 0.70 or 0.60, as the formula is I / (1 - D) and not I / D.

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Old 07-24-2009, 08:29 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabriel Torres View Post
Hi Travis,

Please clarify. If this unit has a duty cycle of 30% or 40%, then on the formula we should use 0.70 or 0.60, as the formula is I / (1 - D) and not I / D.

Cheers,
Gabriel
Duty cycle varies to adjust +12V output voltage. We have to consider the worst case for output rectifiers, which is 0.40 for the forward part and 1-0.30 for the freewheel part, since the device is rated at a certain "average forward" current (I_af).

Let's assume that we're talking about a forward converter, output current on +12V rail is I and inductor ripple current is negligible (to make our calculation easier). The average forward current on forward component and freewhell component is I*D and I*(1-D) respectively. Assume that they're rated at average forward corrent of I1 and I2 respectively, we have following two rules which applies to every possible duty cycle D:

I1>I*D
I2>I*(1-D)

Assume D varies between (0.30, 0.40), we have:

I< min(I1/0.40, I2/0.70).

From that we can see I1 can be much lower than I2, which explains why some manufacturers like Delta uses separate secondary device for forward and freewheel part.
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Old 07-27-2009, 09:56 AM   #6
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Gotcha, thanks for the explanation!
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Old 01-03-2010, 03:38 AM   #7
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Just wondering- can one safely assume that the TP-650 performs similairly well going by this review, or do manufacturers use wilde varying components depending on capacity?
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Old 01-03-2010, 06:36 AM   #8
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Good question. Usually one would assume that the same product line of PSU would be produced by the same manufacturer with the same basic design and quality parts.

Corsair is noted for using different manufactures with quality parts but sometimes with a different design within the same product line. Though all are high quality products.

Antec seems to only had their top of the line 750w unit tested so one can only assume or rely on a trusted source with inside knowledge to knowingly answer your question. On the other hand Antec is a quality supplier of excellent PSU and that can be relied upon. So I suppose you could assume that the 650w model will have similar performance.

In the past when Antec had problems they did stand behind their products.
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