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Old 10-15-2009, 12:47 PM   #1
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Default Seasonic X-Series 650 W Power Supply Review

There has been a new article posted.

Title: Seasonic X-Series 650 W Power Supply Review
URL: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/837

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"Seasonic has just released their 80Plus Gold power supply line-up, X-Series, which promises 90% efficiency. Let's take a look on the 650 W model.As you may be aware, Seasonic is a traditional OEM manu..."

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Old 10-16-2009, 01:56 AM   #2
Olle P
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Quote:
Two things immediately caught our attention. First, all capacitors used on this power supply are Japanes, ... The second thing was ... a DC-DC converter on the secondary, ...
The very first thing that caught my attention was the lack of large heatsinks...

I think the "fan off on low power" feature is a potentially negative issue. When using cases like the Antec Performa series (P18x) the PSU fan is required for quiet cooling of the HDDs. If the PSU fan is supposed to stop every now and then, an additional fan is required for sustained cooling, which will increase the noise level.
I'd rather have the option to allow a steady low fan speed while below some threshold temperature. (Not that it can't be added by some home made device... )

BTW, what was the noise level like at high load? (Subjective ball park comparison to PSUs in general.)

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Old 10-16-2009, 10:32 AM   #3
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Hi Olle,

Noise level from the fan was amazingly lower at full power compared to other power supplies!

Cheers,
Gabriel.
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Old 10-16-2009, 11:28 AM   #4
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I have a few questions:

1. No UL certification???





2.
Quote:
The main +12 V power supply uses a synchronous design, i.e. instead of using Schottky diodes it uses MOSFETs to perform the rectification. ...

Seasonic decided to use the power supply housing as a heatsink for these transistors.
Does this heat tranfer to the inside of the computer case keeping the PSU cooler inside for greater efficiency???

Seems the design of this PSU uses simple ideas to great advantage.


3.How can we figure out which of the modular cables can be used at the same time???




4.
Quote:
Before overloading a power supply we always like to see at what level its over current protection (OCP) circuit is configured. For this test we set +5 V and +3.3 V inputs from our load tester to pull only 1 A each and maxed out the two +12 V inputs for a total of 66 A. The power supply didn’t shut down, meaning that OCP is not present or is configured at a value above that. The manufacturer does not list OCP as a feature, so the first option seems to be the correct one.
Isn't OCP required???
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Old 10-16-2009, 11:31 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Olle P View Post
When using cases like the Antec Performa series (P18x) the PSU fan is required for quiet cooling of the HDDs.

The PSU fan??? How does that work???
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Old 10-16-2009, 01:22 PM   #6
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Merman,

I am quite busy right now to research and reply your other questions. But for the modular cabling system:

On the picture above you can only see half of the connectors available. The other half is soldered directly on the main printed circuit board:

Quote:
Also there is no need for thick or several +12 V wires because half of the modular cabling system – the connectors that carry only +12 V outputs and are connected to the most power-hungry devices like the CPU and video cards – is installed directly on the main printed circuit board.
I.e. the CPU and video cards are connected on the main PCB, while the main motherboard cable, SATA and peripherals are connected on the other PCB (the one on the picture). It has five connectors for SATA/Peripheral cables, so that is the number of SATA/peripheral cables you can use together. Forgot to add this to the text, fixing this now. Thanks.

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Old 10-16-2009, 04:11 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabriel Torres View Post

I.e. the CPU and video cards are connected on the main PCB, while the main motherboard cable, SATA and peripherals are connected on the other PCB (the one on the picture). It has five connectors for SATA/Peripheral cables, so that is the number of SATA/peripheral cables you can use together. Forgot to add this to the text, fixing this now. Thanks.
Thank you for your quick reply.

So assuming all four video card cables can be connected at the same time this unit is well specified.

My understanding is OCP is required for ATX certification.

Some safety certification is needed to sell electrical products in the USA, although UL may not be required anymore.
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Old 10-16-2009, 05:26 PM   #8
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The safety mark seems to be the TUV mark.




http://tuvamerica.com/industry/consumer/elecsafe.cfm

http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...ed=0CBUQ9QEwBA
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Old 10-17-2009, 05:19 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Merman View Post
The PSU fan [for cooling HDDs]??? How does that work???
The PSU and main HDD bay are located in a "tunnel" that's fairly well separated from the rest of the case. The air passing through this tunnel thus serve the purpose of cooling both the HDDs and the PSU (and nothing else). Normally the PSU fan alone is sufficient to keep the HDDs cool, and only with the maximum of four HDDs is an extra fan required.

(And while we're at the subject: Remember that not too many years ago the norm was that the PSU fan was the only fan moving air through the case, and thus responsible for keeping the entire computer sufficiently cool.)

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Old 10-17-2009, 05:21 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabriel Torres View Post
Noise level from the fan was amazingly lower at full power compared to other power supplies!
!!!
That makes me want this PSU more than what's healty to my economy!

/Olle
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