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Old 11-15-2011, 06:52 AM   #1
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Default Thermal Compound Roundup - November 2011

There has been a new article posted.

Title: Thermal Compound Roundup - November 2011
URL: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/artic...mber-2011/1430

Here is a snippet:
"Following up on our Thermal Compound Roundup – October 2011 review, we are adding five more thermal compounds to our roundup, for a total of 50 different models from Akasa, Antec, Arctic Cooling, Arct..."

Comments on this article are welcome.

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Old 11-15-2011, 08:00 AM   #2
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we have a saying here in NZ "Butter makes it better" but apparently mayo is better still

good to see so many different types of thermal compounds being tested makes it real easy to see what works great VS what works ( i knew there was a reason for buying AS5)

hmm popcorn on the HF with butter
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Old 11-15-2011, 11:36 AM   #3
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You should try pritstick or honey next month maybe?

Really enjoying the experimentation here
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Old 11-15-2011, 11:40 AM   #4
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We are thinking about cream cheese, but honey is a good idea. Look for the next month roundup.
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Old 11-15-2011, 11:43 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rafael Coelho View Post
We are thinking about cream cheese, but honey is a good idea. Look for the next month roundup.
Or Golden syrup/ maple syrup/ treacle...
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Old 11-19-2011, 03:30 AM   #6
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20 Karate diamond dust. But don't think you will find that easily or cheap. But lets be realistic. Thermal paste job is to suck the heat sink against cpu as tight as possible for heat transference.
What happens when syrup or glue get hot or cream cheese? It will loose their sticking ability cream cheese will turn into more of a liquid and glue also.

You can try Neoprene because when its heated it turns into a thermo sort of.
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Old 11-20-2011, 01:25 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klinc View Post
20 Karate diamond dust. But don't think you will find that easily or cheap. But lets be realistic. Thermal paste job is to suck the heat sink against cpu as tight as possible for heat transference.
What happens when syrup or glue get hot or cream cheese? It will loose their sticking ability cream cheese will turn into more of a liquid and glue also.

You can try Neoprene because when its heated it turns into a thermo sort of.
Or put the rig at the bottom of the Atlantic and hope it doesn't short out
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Old 11-28-2011, 09:52 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rafael Coelho View Post
We are thinking about cream cheese, but honey is a good idea. Look for the next month roundup.
Diaper ointment - it's mostly zinc-oxide. Try to avoid the kind with cod liver oil in it (diaper rash ointment) as it'll probably smell pretty bad before the 12-hours-later test has finished.

Various salad dressings.

Chap stick lip balm - various flavors.

Gold leaf (being careful not to short-circuit anything).

Peanut butter (Creamy, not chunky ). Do choosy over-clockers choose Jif?

Pencil "lead" (Scribble an even layer of graphite on the CPU heat spreader and on the heatsink base).

-DB
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Old 11-30-2011, 06:20 AM   #9
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Default Thermal Compound and Heat Sink Tests Reviewed

I have never seen the actual installation of heat sinks properly accounted for and analyzed on any of the websites that test heat sinks and thermal compounds, or other hardware.

While a thermal compound conducts heat from the CPU to the heat sink, it also functions as an insulator. A thicker application means more thermal resistance. Unless installation variables like this are taken into account, small differences in test results are likely to be somewhat meaningless, resulting from test methodology and not from the differences in the tested product(s).

How much these factors will affect test results is anyone's guess, but I'm willing to bet that it's significant. I think the actual installation technique of applying thermal compound and installing a heat sink can skew the results enough to make a several degree difference in delta T (the difference between ambient and CPU temperature) results almost meaningless.

But we won't know that for certain unless someone tests for the effects of these somewhat uncontrollable variables.

Simply applying thermal compound and installing a heat sink introduces random installation differences which are likely to skew the results. If my favorite manufacturer gives me a sample to test, I might be more careful with that installation than with compounds or heat sinks from other sources. SO - what may be published as differences attributable to thermal compound or heat sink effectiveness, may very well be the result of not-so-insignificant installation differences, and may not come from differences in the products being tested.

Unless the thickness of the thermal compound is controlled, and the installation temperature is controlled, and the methodology of mounting the heat sink is controlled (which is nearly impossible to do), variables are introduced into the results. Maybe the amount of thermal compound used needs to be weighed or otherwise measured. Maybe some compounds have more uniform results than others, because they flow or creep differently?

These effects remain undetermined, yet they influence the outcome of the testing of these products. I have never seen these variables accounted for, but yet, we all form our opinions and beliefs about the effectiveness of these compounds, which is probably based on inaccurate test (mis)information - and hype, or "spin"!

One of the pictures in the heat sink installation guide on this website shows a cotton swab used to distribute thermal compound. But - are there any cotton fibers left on the CPU during the installation, which affects the final thickness and conductivity of the heat sink compound? The mounting pressure is not enough to squeeze all of the extra compound (or those cotton fibers) out from between the heat sink and the CPU, so the thickness of a compound will vary according to its viscosity and its ability to "creep", or flow, with time.

You probably don't think that ambient temperature affects the resulting delta T? I do, because the viscosity of a thermal compound varies with temperature, which affects the actual thickness of the compound, which will affect delta T measurements, perhaps more so with some compounds than with others.

What I would like to know, is, by how much are the published temperature difference measurements skewed by various installation variables? What one may attribute to the effectiveness of a compound may actually be caused by a number of other factors, which is patently unfair to the various manufacturers of heat sinks and thermal compounds in these reviews.

For example, most of us believe Arctic Silver V is one of the best thermal compounds, and it may very well be so, but have test results shown this because the tester wanted the results to come out this way?

I would like to see multiple tests (maybe a dozen or more, so they become statistically significant) run on the SAME thermal compound, or multiple tests of several different thermal compounds, all run on the same computer hardware and software, maybe at different ambient temperatures, and maybe over a several month time span, and maybe by different testers, so we know what is attributable to a product's effectiveness, and what is attributable to testing variations.

Then, I would like to see the data analyzed statistically to establish a standard deviation for each compound's delta T, to lend technical validity to the results.

That way, when heat sinks and compounds are tested, the results become more meaningful, knowing that, say, two degrees in a delta T measurement between different heat sinks and thermal compounds is really not significant.
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Old 11-30-2011, 07:04 AM   #10
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J14152,
The methodology you suggest is nice, but near impossible to be done in real world. It should take some employees working in those testings full time.
We performed some tests which make us sure that the error indeced by those variables is inside our error margin.
We use always the same hardware and software to test all the thermal compounds, and the application methodology is always the same, even when the manufacturer says to apply it differently. We never used a cotton stab, for example.
About the tester be able to make a better test for one product than for another one, there is only one word to say: ethics.

You can read our tests on applying methods on the review below:

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/artic...al-Grease/1303

http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/artic...se-Part-2/1392

Thanks for your suggestions anyway!
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