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Old 01-11-2006, 03:11 PM   #1
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Default How To Correctly Apply Thermal Grease

There has been a new article posted.

Title: How To Correctly Apply Thermal Grease
URL: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/274

Here is a snippet:
"With processors working at higher and higher clock speeds, a certain concern with thermal dissipation is necessary, because the higher the clock used, the higher the heat produced. To give you an idea..."

Comments on this article are welcome.

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Old 07-14-2006, 05:56 AM   #2
amrbadrawy
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Angry had a problem

thanx alot for a ur very helpfull article
it realy made me know alot of things i didnt know before

i have a very difficult problem...i used alot amount of thermal paste .... it spilled toward the processor pins
and actually they are between the processor pins
my pc is running okay
but i feel no comfort for this paste between the pins
is thier any way to clean it up ?
thanx
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Old 07-26-2006, 06:32 AM   #3
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Hi,

We'd suggest you to use a toothbrush with isopropilic alcohol (isopropanol).

Cheers,
Gabriel.
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Old 01-17-2008, 10:21 AM   #4
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Hi I found this article on google and was going to use it as a guide for somebody since verbally describing it can be confusing. However this guide is absolutely ridiculous. The method you used and depicted for applying the thermal paste is terrible and completely bad ethic. Putting on a blob then just smushing the heatsink down hoping that it'll apply evenly is extremely bad advice.

One of the pictures in question




I registered just now to say that you guys should fix the guide and have it showing somebody using something like an index card to spread the paste EVENLY across the entire top surface of the cpu, edge to edge, to be 100% sure that the there's absolutely enough surface area contacting the cpu.

I'm just afraid somebody else who is new to the whole process will see this, have the paste not spread properly, and get hotspots on the cpu (which we all know the rest of that story).
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Old 01-17-2008, 01:08 PM   #5
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Hi there,

The way we described in the tutorial is the correct way accordingly to the CPU manufacturers.

If you do like you are describing the excess of thermal paste will spill on the motherboard, creating a mess.

Best regards,
Gabriel Torres
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Old 02-12-2008, 07:32 AM   #6
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This is properly more work than is necessary, but I was taught my some old-timers in the field to apply a small amount of TIM to the heatsink, massage it into the base and then gently scrape it off. I was told this pre-fills in the tiny gaps on the heatsink without leaving excess TIM on the base. You can then spread a small amount on the CPU and attach the heatsink.
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Old 03-28-2008, 08:37 PM   #7
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I don`t know about the correct way of applying thermal grease to single exposed die CPU`s ( like those AMD`s ) but the way you described for Intel processors with heatspreaders is pretty wrong. The correct way is to put a small amount of thermal grease on the heatspreader exactly on top of the die as the heat goes mostly right thru the heatspreader and is less important to have the heatspreader covered edge-to-edge or having a small circle of tim on the cpu.

Also casanova was right. It is best if you prepare your heatsink too by applying a small amount of thermal grease and then rub the surface with a lint-free cloth ( glass cleaning cloth ). This way all the microscopic valleys in the heatsink surface are filled too.

I attached an image to better understand what I`m saying. Also this is a good tutorial if you want to know what TIM`s are out there and how to use them.

Cheers !
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Old 10-17-2008, 03:11 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blgdinger View Post
... spread the paste EVENLY across the entire top surface of the cpu, edge to edge, to be 100% sure that the there's absolutely enough surface area contacting the cpu.
The problem with that approach is that it introduces a major risk of getting air trapped between the paste and the heatsink, potentially reducing the contact area quite a bit.
Applying a small blob or line of paste (depending on what CPU you use) on top of the heat spreader and then wiggle the heatsink on is the correct way to prevent that while getting optimum contact where it counts.

Arctic Silver Inc. have some very informative instructions here, that apply to most (all?) pastes.

Cheers
Olle
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Old 06-17-2009, 06:45 PM   #9
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Default No q-tips !

Please don't use a Q-Tip to apply Thermal Grease / Paste.

They shed fibers very easily. You do not want these fibers mixing in with your grease.

A good way to apply grease thinly, and accurately, is place a thin latex (or similar) surgeon's glove on your hand. Apply the grease to your fingertip, and apply a very thin layer to both the CPU and Heat Sink.

If it makes you feel better, afterwards place a tiny spot on the CPU to spread out. It will spread out nicely since you have primed both surfaces beforehand.
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Old 09-26-2009, 10:41 PM   #10
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Default Motherboard bending competition anyone?

I like this article, but the LGA 775 section needs an update.

There are coolers available with backing plates and these don't bend the motherboard. Yes, you do fasten diagonally opposing. . . screws. . . a bit at a time. This decreases installation-time forces at the CPU socket.

For coolers without backing plates (like the model shown) either the motherboard should be removed for cooler installation or you have pre-installed some seemly size rubber blocks (stick on footies stuck to the case) to prevent excess motherboard bending.
These firm little insulators, available at the hardware store, are about 1cm square. Try to avoid putting the adhesive side on the motherboard. You can put 1 or 2 under the CPU, and 1 each at a point very close to where the "push pins" go through.
So equipped, your motherboard won't bend.
Some Asus boards are factory equipped this way.

If not equipped with rubber footies or a backing plate, then the LGA 775 cooler can't be safely installed with the motherboard inside the computer case (according to Intel). The excess flex won't usually "cut off" any connections, but it could degrade the motherboard by weakening solder connections.
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