Hardware Secrets Forums


Go Back   Hardware Secrets Forums > Miscellaneous > Content Comments



Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 06-25-2008, 03:46 PM   #1
Hardware Secrets Team
Administrator
 
Join Date Nov 2004
Posts: 5,576
Hardware Secrets Team is on a distinguished road

Default Gigabyte GA-EP31-DS3L Motherboard

There has been a new article posted.

Title: Gigabyte GA-EP31-DS3L Motherboard
URL: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/575

Here is a snippet:
"We took a look on GA-EP31-DS3L, a motherboard from Gigabyte based on Intel P31 chipset targeted to the mainstream market, coming with a lot of features and a relatively low cost. Check it out!click to..."

Comments on this article are welcome.

Best regards,
Hardware Secrets Team
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com
Hardware Secrets Team is offline   Reply With Quote
new Sponsored Links

Old 06-28-2008, 03:23 AM   #2
Merman
Senior Member
 
Merman's Avatar
 
Join Date May 2008
Posts: 695
Merman is on a distinguished road

Default

From the BIOS illustrations Gigabyte has improved the voltage control section of their low cost boards. Adding de-voltage control and GTLREF control.

Are you going to be doing a review in the future, maybe overclocking an E7200 or E8400???

If not can you explain this new voltage controls???
Merman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2008, 11:21 AM   #3
Gabriel Torres
Administrator
 
Gabriel Torres's Avatar
 
Join Date Oct 2004
USA
Posts: 4,415
Gabriel Torres is on a distinguished road

Default

Hello,

We do this "first look" kind of article when we don't have the time to make a full review.

We don't have plans to make a full review for this motherboard.

GTL is the name of the bus used between the CPU and the north bridge chip and thus GTLREF refers to the voltage used on this bus.

I wasn't the one who wrote this article, so I can't comment on what exactly this other option "DeOverVoltage" does, but I will ask advice from our contributor Rafael Coelho, who was the one that wrote the article.

Cheers,
Gabriel.

Last edited by Gabriel Torres; 06-30-2008 at 02:50 PM.
Gabriel Torres is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2008, 02:44 PM   #4
Rafael Coelho
Super Moderator
 
Rafael Coelho's Avatar
 
Join Date Jun 2008
Posts: 177
Rafael Coelho is on a distinguished road

Default

Hello!
The "DeOverVoltage" allows you to simply reduce the voltage of the circuits. If you want to do an overvolt, use the "OverVoltage" option; if you want to reduce (undervolt), you need to use the "DeOverVoltage" option.
I didnīt understand why to make it as a separate option, if it was easier the "old fashion" way: one option allowing user to select desired voltage, plus or minus.
Cheers
Rafael Coelho
__________________
Thereīs nothing as practical as a good theory.
Rafael Coelho is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2008, 01:40 AM   #5
Merman
Senior Member
 
Merman's Avatar
 
Join Date May 2008
Posts: 695
Merman is on a distinguished road

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabriel Torres View Post
Hello,

GTL is the name of the bus used between the CPU and the north bridge chip and thus GTLREF refers to the voltage used on this bus.
There is an option for FSB voltage, which I assume is the bus for both north and south bridge chips??? I understand increasing this voltage by a small amount can increase system stability when overclocking.

Then there is the GTLREF option with a voltage ratio option.

Seems like the GTLREF is a fine tuning of the FSB to the MCH??? But how does it work??? Does increasing the ratio increase or decrease some aspect of the power on the bus only to the MCH???



BTW that Static tRead Value of 3 (tRD) is outrageous. Did the system boot with that value???
Merman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2008, 02:00 AM   #6
Merman
Senior Member
 
Merman's Avatar
 
Join Date May 2008
Posts: 695
Merman is on a distinguished road

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dungeonmaster View Post
Hello!
The "DeOverVoltage" allows you to simply reduce the voltage of the circuits. If you want to do an overvolt, use the "OverVoltage" option; if you want to reduce (undervolt), you need to use the "DeOverVoltage" option.
I didnīt understand why to make it as a separate option, if it was easier the "old fashion" way: one option allowing user to select desired voltage, plus or minus.
Cheers
Rafael Coelho
Thanks for the info and I agree one option would make more sense.

The ability to lower voltage is nice as more control is always better than less but only makes sense to me if the standard voltage is on the high side??? Which could be the case as I found the standard CPU voltage set to the high side.

With that said, Everest reads my voltages as:
MCH: 1.25v
ICH: 1.05v

Are your standard voltages the same???
Merman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2008, 10:32 AM   #7
Rafael Coelho
Super Moderator
 
Rafael Coelho's Avatar
 
Join Date Jun 2008
Posts: 177
Rafael Coelho is on a distinguished road

Default

Sorry Merman, I don't own this motherboard anymore... So I cannot check this info.
Cheers,
Rafael
__________________
Thereīs nothing as practical as a good theory.
Rafael Coelho is offline   Reply With Quote
new Sponsored Links

Reply

Share This Thread

Bookmarks

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:17 PM.


vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2014 DragonByte Technologies Ltd. ()
Đ 2004-12, Hardware Secrets, LLC. All rights reserved.