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Old 10-13-2013, 11:57 PM   #1
Fabie
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Default modifying OEM power supply to be better and more efficient

Hi masters

I have a OEM power supply which I want to improve a bit
This power supply to be OEM is good quality, the main coil is big etc

Primary:

1: filtering stage: it have 2 polyester caps but only 1 coil.....I must add a 2nd coil?

2: bridge: it have a 6A bridge but line here is 220v, is this enough for 500-600w DC output?

3:Primary capacitors, they are 470 mf....can I replace them by 680 mf caps?



Secondary:

for 5v and 3.3v this PSU uses 1 STPS3045CW schottky in each rail...I think this is ok

but for 12V output it uses one BYQ30E-200 (philips).......which is I sense is a 16 A rectifier diode not a schottky diode
can I replace it by a Mospec S30c100c which I have it from junk?



thanks for your attention
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Old 10-14-2013, 12:53 AM   #2
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I wouldn't worry too much about the primary side. You could replace the input caps with 680uF parts, but 470uF is enough for a 250-300 Watter. As for the 12V rectifier, I would say absolutely try replacing the 16A fast recovery with a 30A schottky, as this will improve its efficiency.

What you should really do is replace the capacitors with Japanese parts and the fan with a decent Ball Bearing or Fluid Dynamic Bearing part. These are about the only two things which usually go wrong with a PSU.
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No wonder it doesn't work! You installed the coils backwards!

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Old 10-14-2013, 09:01 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c.hegge View Post
I wouldn't worry too much about the primary side. You could replace the input caps with 680uF parts, but 470uF is enough for a 250-300 Watter. As for the 12V rectifier, I would say absolutely try replacing the 16A fast recovery with a 30A schottky, as this will improve its efficiency.

What you should really do is replace the capacitors with Japanese parts and the fan with a decent Ball Bearing or Fluid Dynamic Bearing part. These are about the only two things which usually go wrong with a PSU.
thanks M8
ok then I will replace primary caps and change 12v rectifier for the 30A schottky

btw,

This PSU do not have thermal circuit for the fan comes with a 120 mm fan connected direct to 12v, that was very noisy, so I connected the big fan to 5v and now is silent acceptable

is this enough for a proper ventilation?
******
CAPS in the secondary,OK I will replace chinese secondary caps by some rubycon and chemicon I have from junk

this unit comes with

3.3v rail : 2x2200mf 1 before and 1 after coil
5v rail : 2x 2200mf 1 before and 1 after coil
12v rail : 1 x 2200 mf

is this enough capacitance ? or I should add more?
how many capacitance have modern 2012-2013 PSUs in such rails ?

Last edited by Fabie; 10-14-2013 at 09:04 AM.
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Old 10-14-2013, 11:13 AM   #4
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I would beef up the 12V rail to 3300uF if you can fit a 12.5mm diameter cap in there. The others should be fine. Also use the correct series. For Chemi-Con, it's KZE, KY, or LXZ. For Rubycon, it's ZL or YXG. Don't use Chemi-con KZG or KZJ series. Not only are they unsuitable for PSU use, but they are extremely unreliable - just as much so if not more so than the Chinese junk you are removing.

I would try to add a fan controller if you can find one. Some of those lower end power supplies can be quite inefficient and generate a lot of heat. Having it suck on 5V might not be enough.

There's also some instructions on how to make a simple fan controller at http://www.heatsink-guide.com (go to Temperature Control on the left hand side column). I've made these before and they work really well. To tune it, I just unplug the CPU fan on an older spare PC until the CPU reaches 50C, and tune it based on that

Last edited by c.hegge; 10-14-2013 at 02:38 PM.
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No wonder it doesn't work! You installed the coils backwards!

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Old 10-15-2013, 08:35 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c.hegge View Post
I would beef up the 12V rail to 3300uF if you can fit a 12.5mm diameter cap in there. The others should be fine. Also use the correct series. For Chemi-Con, it's KZE, KY, or LXZ. For Rubycon, it's ZL or YXG. Don't use Chemi-con KZG or KZJ series. Not only are they unsuitable for PSU use, but they are extremely unreliable - just as much so if not more so than the Chinese junk you are removing.

I would try to add a fan controller if you can find one. Some of those lower end power supplies can be quite inefficient and generate a lot of heat. Having it suck on 5V might not be enough.

There's also some instructions on how to make a simple fan controller at http://www.heatsink-guide.com (go to Temperature Control on the left hand side column). I've made these before and they work really well. To tune it, I just unplug the CPU fan on an older spare PC until the CPU reaches 50C, and tune it based on that
thanks for the link for the fan controller, I was thinking making one with a LM117 but the hack you posted is more simple I will do it

btw
I changed primary caps and the schottky in the 12v rail and everything works fine
in this PSU there is no place to fit a 12.5mm cap there,The best cap in 1mm I have in 3300 mf is a rubycon MBZ 6.3v, these caps are gold, But I tested with a power supply the maximum voltage it could retain is 10.7v, so useless in the 12v rail, if I put this cap there will explode in 1 second


btw, How I can measure how many A this power supply can deliver in the 12v rail ? my multimeter supports up to 20 A , I tried to measure but the power supply turns off

Last edited by Fabie; 10-15-2013 at 08:43 PM.
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Old 10-15-2013, 09:03 PM   #6
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If you can't squeeze a 12.5mm cap in there, then you will probably be fine with a 10mm 2200uF 16V.

You can't measure the maximum with a multimeter. You would need to go by trial and error (ie. load it up, and see where it stops working). Remember, an ammeter (or DMM with an ammeter function) measures how much current is being drawn from a supply, not what it is capable of. It is designed to go in series with a load, and so as not to interfere with the load, it has almost no resistance (ie, it acts like a piece of wire), so putting it across the output of a PSU will trip the Short Circuit Protection, and cause it to shut down.
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No wonder it doesn't work! You installed the coils backwards!

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Old 10-16-2013, 08:36 AM   #7
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The capacitance value of the caps on the secondary side actually doesn't change ripple much. That just alters the frequencies that the LC filter attacks. If you want to reduce ripple magnitude, you need a cap with lower ESR.


Also never short a power supply through an ammeter with no load. You could damage both the power supply and the meter. I'm surprised you didn't blow a fuse in your multimeter.
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Old 10-16-2013, 12:14 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CM Phaedrus View Post
The capacitance value of the caps on the secondary side actually doesn't change ripple much. That just alters the frequencies that the LC filter attacks. If you want to reduce ripple magnitude, you need a cap with lower ESR.
True. I was kind of oversimplifying things. Basically, as the capacitance and can size goes up, the ESR goes down. That was why I suggested using larger caps.
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No wonder it doesn't work! You installed the coils backwards!

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Old 10-17-2013, 04:53 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CM Phaedrus View Post
The capacitance value of the caps on the secondary side actually doesn't change ripple much. That just alters the frequencies that the LC filter attacks. If you want to reduce ripple magnitude, you need a cap with lower ESR.


Also never short a power supply through an ammeter with no load. You could damage both the power supply and the meter. I'm surprised you didn't blow a fuse in your multimeter.

you mean ro reduce ripple I must use something like rubycon MBZ or chemicon kzg/kzj series ?

btw, my multimeter is not fused in the part of 20A, yes is fused in the part of 200 MA , uses a fuse of 0.2A
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Old 10-17-2013, 08:34 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fabie View Post
you mean ro reduce ripple I must use something like rubycon MBZ or chemicon kzg/kzj series ?

btw, my multimeter is not fused in the part of 20A, yes is fused in the part of 200 MA , uses a fuse of 0.2A
Yes, or polymer caps. You could have a bigger impact changing out the inductor, but unless you have an LCR meter to measure inductance and have a source for an inductor with a similar foot print, that's not really practical.

Of course your DMM isn't fused on the 20A range. Safety? That would cost money, and we can't have that! *sigh*
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