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Old 06-27-2011, 08:39 AM   #1
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Default Cougar RS 650 W Power Supply Review

There has been a new article posted.

Title: Cougar RS 650 W Power Supply Review
URL: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/artic...ly-Review/1323

Here is a snippet:
"Cougar is a brand that belongs to HEC/Compucase, originally targeted to the European market. Recently, they started expanding to the North American market as well. The RS series is comprised of models..."

Comments on this article are welcome.

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Old 06-27-2011, 01:34 PM   #2
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Default An Explosive Review.

Interesting review. What one considers an explosion to be is relative I guess, as many of us would consider that to be what we see in an action movie. While this explosion is not what some may have expected it to be (or hoped for) it is obviously not good. The potential for a fire in the PS and then in one's home or office is not something we expect from consumer electronics.

I have a small problem with calling 48C/118.4F "room temperature", but it easily could be the temperature within a small, poorly ventilated PC case (an average all-in-one PC.) I've never been in a room at 118F, and I hope I never will be. As I've always be a fanatic for large PC cases with many fans, I guess my PC's hardware is in a non-mainstream environment, and I don't understand the reality of many PCs.

Given the over-current protection circuit failed, the failure of that diode could be considered a safety mechanism, preventing a more catastrophic failure or explosion. Perhaps users (and testers) of this PS would be fortunate that the explosion was as minor as it was. I thought that considering the price of a single diode is small, a more robust one would not cost much more, but assuming it survived what would of failed next? I also wonder what damage the hardware in a PC would have suffered when this PS failed as it did, in contrast to a PS tester, which is protected (hopefully) from such damage.

Regardless, thank you for warning us about the potential danger of using this PS, that is of great significance, who knows what carnage you may have prevented for those that may have or do own this unit.
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Old 06-28-2011, 01:00 AM   #3
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I think one reason for the failure might be that the design of the primary hasn't been properly adapted for functionality with the low voltage feeds you have "over there".

With twice the normal current running through the primary the components get too hot.
That heat will also influence components on the secondary, especially if they share the same heatsink.

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Old 06-28-2011, 09:35 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parsec View Post
I have a small problem with calling 48C/118.4F "room temperature", but it easily could be the temperature within a small, poorly ventilated PC case (an average all-in-one PC.) I've never been in a room at 118F, and I hope I never will be. As I've always be a fanatic for large PC cases with many fans, I guess my PC's hardware is in a non-mainstream environment, and I don't understand the reality of many PCs.
It is just a matter os semantics. We mean "ambient temperature." In other words, the temperature around the PSU, which we simulate to be the temperature inside the case.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Olle P View Post
I think one reason for the failure might be that the design of the primary hasn't been properly adapted for functionality with the low voltage feeds you have "over there".

With twice the normal current running through the primary the components get too hot.
That heat will also influence components on the secondary, especially if they share the same heatsink.

Cheers
Olle
Or ventilation. The PSU case is too small (140 mm deep) with too many components to fit in such small space.

Last edited by Gabriel Torres; 06-30-2011 at 10:07 AM. Reason: typo
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Old 06-29-2011, 10:05 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabriel Torres View Post
The PSU case is too small (140 mm deep) ...
That's not too small. That's spot on the ATX standard size!
If that's not big enough they should use the CPX standard size instead...

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Old 08-11-2011, 12:08 PM   #6
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As I can see on the PSU Label, the max. output load for the second +12V rail (+12V2) is only 20Amps.! Only the first one (+12V1) has a max output current of 30Amps.
Maybe you have simply overload the second output with 23Amps in your test?

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Old 08-12-2011, 10:33 AM   #7
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We have to test power supplies using the same methodology, so the results can be comparable. That said, all other 650 W power supplies we reviewed to day were tested with the same methodology and survived, even when the current surpassed what was written on the label. Moreover, if overloading was really the issue here, the unit would need to shut down and not explode, since it is listed as having over current protection (OCP). However, since the problem was in the primary (and not in the secondary), the over power protection (OPP) should have kicked in. So, the power supply is flawed, no matter how you look at the issue.

Our load pattern tries to simulate a load that makes sense. If we lower current at +12 V and increase at +5 V and +3.3 V, the results wouldn't be good, because that is not how modern computers consume current/power. Very little is pulled from the +5 V and +3.3 V outputs, and most is pulled from the +12 V output, since this is where the CPU and video cards are connected to.

Also, another bit of information that you are probably not aware of. When the power supply explodes, it means that components on the primary side burned. When the problem is in the primary, it has absolutely nothing to do on how we loaded the unit. We probably could load it in a different way and the unit would explode anyway, since the problem is located in the primary, no in the secondary. When the problem is in the primary, it means the problem is with the total amount of power pulled, not the distribution. It could be a problem with distribution if the component that burned was the +12 V rectifier, which was not the case.

Thanks,
Gabriel.

Last edited by Gabriel Torres; 08-12-2011 at 10:42 AM.
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