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Old 03-13-2012, 01:36 AM   #1
RilleL
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Default Building a new PC, need help with components!

Hi, I would appreciate some help or comments on my new PC I want to build.
It's suppose to be a mid-high PC, useful for everyday tasks and can handle games.

Processor:
Intel Core i5 2500K - Pretty documented to give a lot of value for the price.
Intel Core i5 2550K - For a little bit more I can get this instead. It is worth it?
Intel Core i7 3820 - For a moderate increase in price. Main difference is 6mb->10mb L3 cache I suppose. I'm guessing it not worth it, but comments?

Graphics card:
MSI GeForce GTX 560Ti 448 core - A lot of performance for the price
MSI GeForce GTX 570 - For a slight increase in price. I've heard though that 560ti-448 almost gives as much performance. Comments?

HDD/SSD:
Primary: Corsair SSD Force 3 Series 240GB - Thoughts?
Secondary: 2TB Seagate Barracuda or 2TB Western Digital Caviar Black - Both seems to have the same specs and rpm, however WD is 73% more expensive. I've traditionally used WD because I believe their quality to be good, but it's a hard pill to swallow. Thoughts?

RAM (is triple channel anything to consider?):
Corsair 8GB (2x4096MB) CL8 1600Mhz VENGEANCE - Honestly the difference between RAM is pretty small, I guess this RAM is good enough unless more channels are an issue? Also, you need to change timings ect in BIOS since they default to higher and lower frequency yes?

Motherboard:
I really have no clue. The idea is that I will have this PC for some time for potential for upgrades and I rather not switch out the mobo. Intel will continue to use socket 1155 right?
Also, while I probably won't get SLI if it has that feature it wouldn't be bad. Should also be able to install wireless network card for internet and USB 3.0. Basically a stable mobo for long term use. I need suggestions.
Are Asus P8Z68-V GEN3 or Asus SABERTOOTH P67 decent?

PSU:
Obviously a strong, stable PSU with maybe the potential for SLI in the future (amazing valued PSU without SLI works too). No clue really.

Case:
I honestly have no clue, but I stumbled upon Fractal Design Define XL. It seems you guys gave it a good recommendation here on this site, big plus that it's sound dampening too. I'm wondering though how a front door works with fans in the front?

If there's anything I've missed please tell me. I really need the feedback so any comments are welcome.

Thanks
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Old 03-13-2012, 02:55 AM   #2
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Processor: 2500K or 2400 if you're not planning on OCing it. SB processors are sort of like determining if you want to go fast or really fast. An 3820 would be for very niche applications where you want quad channel RAM and probably are an OC enthusiast.

GPU: The GTX 560 Ti 448 core ~ Long name, but good GPU.

SSD: 240gb might be a bit much. SSDs tend to get the most use out of normal everyday PC users as boot disk drives. 60-128gb drives work fine for this. You can install PC games, but it doesn't really improve performance other than loading screens (saving six seconds on a loading screen is underwhelming- especially when you spent hundreds on it).

RAM: I don't have a SB motherboard, but I've heard that some require you to tweak them manually. Dual channel is fast enough unless you're doing graphics design.

Motherboard: 1155 will be for IvyBridge too, but I doubt they'll continue it after that. The ASUS looks good.

PSU: Check Hardware Secret's awarded products.

A Corsair TX750 V2 is probably what I'd default to suggesting.
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Old 03-14-2012, 12:01 AM   #3
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Thanks for your input.

I have a question on cooling though. I've spend a lot of time looking at components when I don't know how well they'll work together and the cooling involved, it's hard to estimate that.
Assuming I go for the Fractal Design Define XL, and I'll probably add another 140mm fan in front. That's 2x front fans, 1x top fan and 1x rear fan. The fans are apparently very quiet but also doesn't move much air.
Is this enough for cooling? Does a full tower case actually make it worse since it will be harder to move more air?
Does 2500k come with it's own cooler/heatsink? I've read people getting a custom one and they've dramatically lowered the temp on the CPU, same with the Gfx card. Is that something to consider?

Thanks
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Old 03-14-2012, 11:42 PM   #4
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Ambient temp is usually what dictates how much cooling you need. If the PC is next to a heater, of course you're going to need more airflow.

Assuming you're not OCing everything and/or doing SLI/Xfire with GPUs that are known to give off a lot of heat, a basic setup of having fans push air in the front and out the back keeps the PC within limits. (In addition, there's people who torture test or run benchmarks a lot, but you don't seem to be that sort of person)


The CPU cooler that comes with the Intel GPU is sufficient at stock speeds, but isn't meant to be used for OCing (that's pretty much true of any stock CPU cooler). Typically, having a CPU/GPU temp under what the engineers say is safe for that particular component doesn't really provide any sort of quantifiable benefit. For example, you could hook up a liquid nitrogen setup to your CPU and run your PC at stock speeds with silly low temps, but this doesn't do anything more for you than running it with a decent cooler.

Good cooling keeps your PC cool and reduces noise. PC cooling becomes a much larger factor when you OC or if ambient temp is a big problem.
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Old 03-18-2012, 01:23 PM   #5
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Quoting: tinyurl/falconguide

"CASE
Omissions: some of the cases that were omitted for various reasons (too costly/not as good as the alternative/ect ect) are:
Fractal Define R2/R3/XL"

Should I be worried? Or is it simply a case of the cost and not the quality of the case itself?

Edit: sry if I'm being difficult. I'm just really paranoid in getting the "wrong" case since I'll be stuck with it for a long time.

Last edited by RilleL; 03-18-2012 at 03:31 PM.
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Old 03-18-2012, 03:53 PM   #6
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I wouldn't be worried.

Cases tend to carry a lot of subjective performance. Unlike CPUs where I can run tests can objectively say an Intel Pentium 4 computes slower than a Intel Core i3 2100.


The Fractal Design XL is a full tower case. This means it's huge and heavy (about 40 lbs/18kgs) even without everything installed. I have an Antec 300 (about half the weight) and with everything installed it's rather hefty to lug around. Keep this in mind if you intend to move it around.
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Old 03-19-2012, 04:36 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C.W. View Post
Processor: 2500K or 2400 if you're not planning on OCing it. SB processors are sort of like determining if you want to go fast or really fast. An 3820 would be for very niche applications where you want quad channel RAM and probably are an OC enthusiast.

GPU: The GTX 560 Ti 448 core ~ Long name, but good GPU.

SSD: 240gb might be a bit much. SSDs tend to get the most use out of normal everyday PC users as boot disk drives. 60-128gb drives work fine for this. You can install PC games, but it doesn't really improve performance other than loading screens (saving six seconds on a loading screen is underwhelming- especially when you spent hundreds on it).

RAM: I don't have a SB motherboard, but I've heard that some require you to tweak them manually. Dual channel is fast enough unless you're doing graphics design.

Motherboard: 1155 will be for IvyBridge too, but I doubt they'll continue it after that. The ASUS looks good.

PSU: Check Hardware Secret's awarded products.

A Corsair TX750 V2 is probably what I'd default to suggesting.
Ah I am glad I saw this thread my mate and I were wondering about the IB fitting the 1155 boards but we are actually looking the second gen SB i5's - is it worth waiting for the IB as we do mainly graphical stuff and very little if any gaming.

To the original poster I would go the Seagate drives as I have had nothing but grief with those noisy WD and Samsungs.

My personal case choice is the Coolermaster 890 as it so well vented and couple it with a Corsair HX 650 - or should we / I go larger given that the machine will be used for graphical stuff.

Also CW the GPU you quoted - is it going to affect the choice of the PSU I like?

Sorry for taking over but didn't want to start another unnecessary thread re the Ivy Bridge.
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Old 03-20-2012, 01:45 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnArgus View Post
Ah I am glad I saw this thread my mate and I were wondering about the IB fitting the 1155 boards but we are actually looking the second gen SB i5's - is it worth waiting for the IB as we do mainly graphical stuff and very little if any gaming.
IB will be a refresh of SB, so the architecture should be tweaked and streamlined. Intel uses a 'tick-tock' model of development. Tick = smaller and more efficient, while Tock = new microarchitecture. IB is a tick of SB.

So to answer your question, there will be better performance (if we compared say a 4 core SB @ 3 ghz vs a 4 core IB @ 3 ghz), but unlikely that it'll be on a massive boost. The actual performance is unknown at the moment- we'll have to wait till later this year to find out.

I think waiting is generally a vicious cycle unless it's due to budgeting. Once something is out, there is always going to be something better on the horizon.

Quote:
To the original poster I would go the Seagate drives as I have had nothing but grief with those noisy WD and Samsungs.
Samsung is a part of Seagate, just like Hitachi is a part of WD.


Quote:
My personal case choice is the Coolermaster 890 as it so well vented and couple it with a Corsair HX 650 - or should we / I go larger given that the machine will be used for graphical stuff.

Also CW the GPU you quoted - is it going to affect the choice of the PSU I like?
A 560 Ti 448 would require a 550W PSU. So a 650W PSU would be sufficient unless you're planning on upgrading to SLI or something like that in the future.

http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforc...-core-review/7
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Old 03-20-2012, 05:30 PM   #9
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Thanks CW well I suppose the i5 SB is tried and tested and probably more than good enough for what I / we are going to do and I suppose the boards are ready to go too - the only problem is choice

I'll stick with the 650 as it has been a nice unit so far. The drives I referred to my own experience of them was before Samsung and Seagate got hitched and perhaps now the Samsungs will be better. I must admit that noisy things do annoy me a fair bit and the read/ write clicking of the original Samsung drove me mad - mind you the SSD has made life so much quieter (and faster eh?)
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Old 03-20-2012, 09:50 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AnArgus View Post
I'll stick with the 650 as it has been a nice unit so far. The drives I referred to my own experience of them was before Samsung and Seagate got hitched and perhaps now the Samsungs will be better. I must admit that noisy things do annoy me a fair bit and the read/ write clicking of the original Samsung drove me mad - mind you the SSD has made life so much quieter (and faster eh?)
I know the sound cause I have several functioning HDDs (and one SSD) in my PC (along with a couple ancient ones next to it). It definitely can be annoying, but I've probably tuned it out or maybe it's because I always wear headphones which helps cancel out background noise. In terms of HDDs, I'm generally most concerned about how long they last. Okay performance + rock solid stability > great performance + dead in a year.

I have the Corsair 650HX and it's an excellent PSU (if somewhat older). IMO, Corsair's older 2nd gen PSUs were some of the best. They still make decent ones, but the lower end traded quality for lower price points. Granted, your average PC doesn't need a sleek PSU, so it was a fair tradeoff.
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