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Old 11-13-2005, 06:36 AM   #1
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Default How to Build a Small Network Using a Broadband Router

There has been a new article posted.

Title: How to Build a Small Network Using a Broadband Router
URL: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/246

Here is a snippet:
"Broadband routers are the easiest way for you to build your own network. Using them, you can automatically share your broadband Internet connection among all computers on your network, as well as file..."

Comments on this article are welcome.

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Old 08-26-2008, 07:09 PM   #2
zahadum
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Exclamation too narrow a perspective!

(1) you assume that only windoze users will be using broadband.

duh :-(

the mac now has 20% marketshare (retail usa laptops) - which is going to hit 30% next year based on the latest market research (of purchasing intentions).

so start being more inclusive!

sure, the mac is easier to use but there is still lots you can do to help the 'switchers' understand connectivity issues from a mac perspective!


(2) your price watcher side-bar omits apple's own "Airport" product - which is in the top 5 selling wireless routers in the market! --

obviously apple's AIRPORT network router is cross-platform for windows & mac etc (since tcp/ip was itself borrowed from unix in order to enable cross-platform connectivity) ...

but in addition to being popular, the Apple AIRPORT is worthy of mention because it also has the advantage of doing double-duty as a NAS ... it's USB port can be used for more than just a print-server; it can support DASD, which is useful when a household wants to have a shared drive as a media server!


(3) you make a wildly inaccurate and DANGEROUS statement about the basic features of cheap (ie pc-oriented) routers:

most commodity routers do NOT include a switch: they usually are crippled with only a hub!

this subtle short-coming has devastating consequences for your intended audience (noobs) because it would be very easy to for a household to haphazardly chain together several router/hubs & then be completely mystified why none of the machines inside the household have any local visibility across subnets!

indeed, such a household would be forced to learn the intricacies of port-forewarding in order to unify all the LAN's inside the household!

- which is an ugly price to pay for misbriefed at the beginning of your article
-- this aspect of the hardware purchase should be /emphasized/
--- it should not be dismissed cursorily in passing!

please correct this point so that users understand the implications of extending their network when they chain together switches vs bridges vs hubs!

at that juncture in the article, you should emphasize that switches are not the best value in order to extend the network; the average user is probably better off buying a bridge type of product -- eg apple Airport _EXPRESS_ (aka APX @ $100) -- for two reasons:

* first, a wifi bridge (like the 'APX') offers extra hardware redundancy in case the primary router fails

* second, a wifi bridge (like the 'APX') offers the extra convenience/flexibility of more wifi range, unlike a switch, which will require messy cables running everywhere.


(4) you should convert this article into a video podcast so that the befuddled user can have a data source that is independent of his internet connection (after he has transferred over from direct connection to an intermediate connection via the router).

(note: podcasts can certainly support a legible resolution for a tutorial, when the iPod is connected to a TV).

Last edited by zahadum; 08-26-2008 at 07:21 PM. Reason: typos
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Old 08-28-2008, 09:02 AM   #3
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Default

Hello and thanks for your comments,

Our website is targeted exclusivelly to the PC market, not Mac. If you want to read more specific articles about Mac please visit websites about it.

Best regards,
Gabriel Torres
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Old 03-04-2010, 10:13 PM   #4
LockHearT
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Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by zahadum View Post
(1) you assume that only windoze users will be using broadband.

duh :-(

the mac now has 20% marketshare (retail usa laptops) - which is going to hit 30% next year based on the latest market research (of purchasing intentions).

so start being more inclusive!

sure, the mac is easier to use but there is still lots you can do to help the 'switchers' understand connectivity issues from a mac perspective!


(2) your price watcher side-bar omits apple's own "Airport" product - which is in the top 5 selling wireless routers in the market! --

obviously apple's AIRPORT network router is cross-platform for windows & mac etc (since tcp/ip was itself borrowed from unix in order to enable cross-platform connectivity) ...

but in addition to being popular, the Apple AIRPORT is worthy of mention because it also has the advantage of doing double-duty as a NAS ... it's USB port can be used for more than just a print-server; it can support DASD, which is useful when a household wants to have a shared drive as a media server!


(3) you make a wildly inaccurate and DANGEROUS statement about the basic features of cheap (ie pc-oriented) routers:

most commodity routers do NOT include a switch: they usually are crippled with only a hub!

this subtle short-coming has devastating consequences for your intended audience (noobs) because it would be very easy to for a household to haphazardly chain together several router/hubs & then be completely mystified why none of the machines inside the household have any local visibility across subnets!

indeed, such a household would be forced to learn the intricacies of port-forewarding in order to unify all the LAN's inside the household!

- which is an ugly price to pay for misbriefed at the beginning of your article
-- this aspect of the hardware purchase should be /emphasized/
--- it should not be dismissed cursorily in passing!

please correct this point so that users understand the implications of extending their network when they chain together switches vs bridges vs hubs!

at that juncture in the article, you should emphasize that switches are not the best value in order to extend the network; the average user is probably better off buying a bridge type of product -- eg apple Airport _EXPRESS_ (aka APX @ $100) -- for two reasons:

* first, a wifi bridge (like the 'APX') offers extra hardware redundancy in case the primary router fails

* second, a wifi bridge (like the 'APX') offers the extra convenience/flexibility of more wifi range, unlike a switch, which will require messy cables running everywhere.


(4) you should convert this article into a video podcast so that the befuddled user can have a data source that is independent of his internet connection (after he has transferred over from direct connection to an intermediate connection via the router).

(note: podcasts can certainly support a legible resolution for a tutorial, when the iPod is connected to a TV).
@Zahadum can you atleast say thank you for the hardwork he put in this tutorial... it may have some flaws but no one is perfect

@Gabriel ...Regardless what he says ... I found your tutorial help full and informative because of you I learn a lot of things keep up the good work! Kudos
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